Welcome To Swords


Swords is literally up the road from Dublin’s main airport. With a major shopping centre, retail and business parks, this north County Dublin town is now a significant centre for commerce and an administrative capital for the area.
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  • Self Catering

Information Swords Ireland

A little country town that has since morphed into a large satellite of Dublin City, Swords is literally up the road from Dublin’s main airport. With a major shopping centre, retail and business parks, this north County Dublin town is now a significant centre for commerce and an administrative capital for the area. Fingal County Hall (completed in 2001) is an impressive glass structure on the town’s main street. Redevelopment of the town’s centre in recent years has led to some difficulty for motorists and traffic, but most of the work is now complete. Swords comes from the Irish “Sord Cholm Cille”. It can trace its origins back to foundation in 560 by Saint Colmcille. Colmcille blessed a local well from which the town derives its name. Sord means clear or pure. It can also denote “water source” and may be derived from a communal drinking well that could have existed in earlier times. The body of High King Brian Boru is said to have been taken to either Swords Castle or Swords Abbey following his death at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. The town’s main streets offer restaurants, pubs and hotels for food and accommodation. The Pavilions shopping centre is some distance from the town centre and has been known to be so busy at peak times that it is difficult to find a space in the large car park. Airside Retail Park is another shopping centre, where toy stores can be found alongside furniture and hardware shops. The retail park is also home to car dealerships, hotels and businesses of various kinds. Towards the end of every summer, Swords Heritage Festival is held in the town. Events celebrating the history and culture of the town of Swords and its environs – often sponsored by local business and attended by local political representatives – are held for a week or more, with organisers often seen in period dress from early Christian and Anglo-Norman times.

Attractions Swords Ireland

A trip along the Liffey - Dublin City

As Eddie Rabbit said in the Commitments there are two Dublin's, North & South. The Liffey is the border. The river rises in the Wicklow mountains near Poulaphuca , south of Dublin. it enters the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay. It is over 120Kms long. It is spanned by many bridges in the city. The first one is Sean Heuston bridge, located near the entrance to the Phoenix Park, the last bridge is the East link bridge, not far east of the Customs House. The sights along the Liffey include the National Museum, Customs House and Guinness Brewery.

Blarney Woollen Mills - Dublin City

Located in Nassau Street ; A huge range of woolen products. The great Irish shopping experience.

Brown Thomas - Dublin City

Located in Grafton Street ; Renown clothing store

Bull Island - Dublin City

Bull Island is 5km long and 800m wide, and the area above high tide is approximately 300 hectares. It contains a wide range of natural habitats which include inter tidal mudflats, salt marsh, freshwater marsh, dunes, and beach area. The mudflats support a large population of birds, at any time up to 27,000 birds are present, which gives the area the highest bird density in Ireland. The Island also provides the only Irish example of an undisturbed sequence of plant communities, from salt marsh to dune vegetation.

Casino Marino - Dublin City

Casino is located at Marino, just off the Malahide Road and only 3 miles north of the centre of Dublin. It was designed by Sir William Chambers as a pleasure house for James Caulfeild, 1st Earl of Charlemont. It is one of the finest 18th century neo-classical buildings in Europe. The Casino, meaning "small house", surprisingly contains a total of 16 finely decorated rooms.